Saturday, October 30, 2010

Get An Amazing Flying Experience with Device Control Helicopters

The only way to keep up with the latest about RC Helicopter is to constantly stay on the lookout for new information. If you read everything you find about RC Helicopter, it won't take long for you to become an influential authority.

Hopefully the information presented so far has been applicable. You might also want to consider the following:

Choosing your Helicopter Remote Controlled... First off, let's define beginner's RC helicopter. If the thought of flying a helicopter "in general" were intriguing, then a beginner's helicopter would require "no experience" and "easy-to-fly". If it is the challenge of flying a Remote Control helicopter that is intriguing, then a beginners helicopter would require "no experience" but not so "easy-to-fly". Those are the 2 we will be discussing here.

The "no experience" and "easy-to-fly" remote control helicopter falls under the category of a "coaxial helicopter". These helicopters have 2 counter-rotating blades that keep it very stable while flying; they are a mini helicopter and are meant to fly indoors. Like a full-size helicopter that has a tail-rotor to keep it stable, the 2 counter-rotating blades have the same effect. When you increase speed, it doesn't have the ability to want to spin in circles, therefore making it easy to fly, you only have to think about speed and direction, (increase speed, it takes off from the ground) (forward, reverse, left and right). At hover, it will do just that, fly in place. Add left and it will turn in circles, add forward and left, it begins to fly around like a helicopter.

Another beginners RC Helicopter are the single-rotor-fixed-pitch helicopter. Although it is not as easy to fly as the coaxial helicopter, it behaves much like a real one; therefore there is a learning curve.

There are training tools available, like training skids that attach to the landing gear, making a big "X" to help keep it from wanting to tip over, or there are flight simulators that will help also. When learning to fly fixed-pitch heli's, think about an inexpensive model with parts readily available.

You first want to learn to hover, as this is quite a challenge in itself. Stay about a foot off the ground and try keeping it there, you will also want the helicopter facing away from you because your left and right is the helicopters left and right. When you feel confident with your hovering, try moving short distances at a time, practicing all directions. Once you master that, try with the helicopter facing you, now your left and right are reversed from the helicopter, the helicopters left is on your right, and it does get confusing unless you've had experience with something else, car, boat, airplane.

When you master those techniques, then fly a little higher off the ground, maybe eye level. It shouldn't be much different, except flying close to the ground; you have what is called ground effects from the blades creating different airflow and easier for the heli to hover. The blades are so close to the ground, it is actually helping you hover. As you get higher off the ground, you "lose" that ground effect and it requires more power for lift.

Now that wasn't hard at all, was it? And you've earned a wealth of knowledge, just from taking some time to study an expert's word on RC Helicopter.

3-Channel Mini RC Helicopter 6020 by ceciliagake

Learning Approach

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